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This definition explains the meaning of Seed Pod and why it matters. Your access to this site has been limited by the site owner If you think you have been blocked in error, contact the owner of this site for assistance. If you are a WordPress user with Hairy bittercress is an annual weed that can spread quickly.

Seed Pod

A seed pod is exactly what it sounds like – a pod produced on a cannabis plant after fertilization that contains seeds. However, unlike with growing vegetables and fruit, seeds are undesirable when growing cannabis for consumption, and the presence of seed pods can mean mutation, or the presence of a male plant, rather than a female plant.

Maximum Yield Explains Seed Pod

In the world of cannabis, female plants produce flowers, which are what humans consume (buds). Under natural conditions, male and female plants would intermix, allowing fertilization to occur, and the pollen of the male to fertilize the flowers of the female, resulting in the development of seeds. Those seeds would then be dispersed to grow new plants elsewhere. In cultivation for consumption, this is not what you want. The presence of a seed pod can indicate that you have a male plant mixed in with your female plants.

When cultivating cannabis for consumption, only female plants are desired, as only female plants produce buds. Male plants do produce trace amounts of THC in their leaves, but this isn’t sufficient for consumption. The best way to tell if male plants are present is to check the shape of the flowers – male flowers look dramatically different to buds grown on a female flower.

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All male plants should be removed prior to pollen development to ensure that they do not fertilize female plants. Buying from a reputable grower that creates feminized seeds is a good way to reduce the chance of inadvertently growing male plants.

However, the presence of seed pod does not automatically mean that a male plant is present. Female plants can mutate under growing stress and become hermaphrodites. These can then self-fertilize and create seed pods without the need for a natural male plant in the area.

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Hairy bittercress: A weed to watch out for

Hairy bittercress is an annual weed that can spread quickly.

Flowers and seed pods of hairy bittercress. Photo by Lori Imboden, MSU Extension.

Have you recently noticed plants with small, white flowers on the edges of your lawn, flowerbeds and rock pathways? During April and May, populations of the winter annual weed hairy bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta) become increasingly visible. Hairy bittercress has a low growing rosette similar in form to a dandelion. It raises its profile in early spring with the appearance of flowers and seeds on a vertical stem. Like many members of the mustard family, hairy bittercress sets seed prolifically. It grows quickly and a few plants or seeds can generate a more widespread infestation in even a year’s time.

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The first true leaves of hairy bittercress are heart shaped. Photo by Erin Hill, MSU.

Hairy bittercress is a winter annual weed. Its seeds germinate in fall beginning as early as September. The first true leaves are heart-shaped, followed by compound leaves with two or more pairs of leaflets and a kidney shaped terminal leaflet. The leaves that emerge in the fall form a small rosette that will overwinter. Once the weather warms in spring, it sends up stalks of small, white flowers followed by slender seed pods known as siliques.

Hairy bittercress leaves have two or more pairs of leaflets and a kidney shaped terminal leaflet. Photo by Lori Imboden, MSU Extension.

Once the seed pods ripen, disturbing the pods can propel the seeds as far as 16 feet from the mother plant. This seed dispersal adds to the soil seed bank and primes the area for another infestation to emerge in early fall. After setting seed, the life cycle is complete and the plants die. Hairy bittercress and other winter annual weed species, like common chickweed and purple deadnettle, are not typically present during the summer months.

Once the seed pods ripen, disturbing the pods will send the seeds flying as far as 16 feet. Photo by Lori Imboden, MSU Extension.

Hairy bittercress is best managed mechanically when it is young. Remove it by hand, hoe or tillage in early fall or early spring before it sets seed. If plants are flowering, composting is discouraged as seeds may develop. To manage this weed using herbicides, the proactive approach would be to use a pre-emergence herbicide in the late summer (late August to early September) to target the plants at the time of germination and prevent successful emergence.

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If plants have already emerged, applying a post-emergence herbicide to actively growing plants before seedpods form may be effective. If using an herbicide, be certain it contains an active ingredient that will target this weed. Always read and follow all labeled instructions to increase effectiveness and prevent personal or environmental harm.

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